Latest Blog Entries

Polkinghorne’s Open and Relational Path

January 16th, 2015 / No Comments

I’ve been thinking about the various paths Christians take to embracing open and relational theology. John Polkinghorne is among those for whom science led to open and relational themes. For Polkinghorne and many other science and religion scholars, it makes sense to say an open and relational God creates an open and relational universe. My […]

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Open and Process Theologies Blur?

January 7th, 2015 / 1 Comment

Open and process theologies have much in common. But differences also exist. The future of open theology, in my view, will be largely shaped by ongoing conversations between the two theological perspectives. But I expect them to draw closer and their boundaries to blur.

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The Future of Open Theology

January 2nd, 2015 / 1 Comment

Open theology has matured in many ways since the ground-breading publication of The Openness of God book twenty years ago. I’ve been thinking about what the next twenty years might be for open theology.

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Does it Make Sense to Believe in Miracles?

December 5th, 2014 / 26 Comments

In the final chapter of my current book on providence, I address the issue of miracles. This book project is funded as part of a larger grant I received to explore what it means to believe God acts providentially in a world of randomness. Much of my discussion in this last chapter revolves around various […]

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Pannenberg Dies; An Interview

September 8th, 2014 / 2 Comments

One of the most influential theologians in the latter half of the 20th century, Wolfhart Pannenberg, has died. I sat down with Pannenberg a decade or so ago to talk about his life and thought. For the first time in print, here's my full-length interview with him.

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The Most Neglected Issue in Explanations of Evil

September 4th, 2014 / 12 Comments

In my current book, I offer a model of providence I call “Essential Kenosis.” One of my main arguments is that this model gives a plausible reason why a loving and powerful God fails to prevent genuine evil. One aspect of my argument, however, addresses what we might call God's "constitution." I find this aspect neglected more than any other by those who address the problem of evil.

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